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Russia's Energy Bully Takes a Fall

"After years as Eurasia's energy bully, Russia's state-controlled natural gas monopoly, Gazprom, is getting a taste of its own medicine," stated Alexandros Petersen in a recent article published by Foreign Policy earlier this week.

Russia's Energy Bully Takes a Fall

"After years as Eurasia's energy bully, Russia's state-controlled natural gas monopoly, Gazprom, is getting a taste of its own medicine," stated Alexandros Petersen in an article published by Foreign Policy earlier this week. According to Petersen, the shift in demand for natural gas throughout Europe, combined with persistent low prices, has caused the Russian giant to reconsider its marketing and pricing strategies. Now that the tables have turned, European countries, heavily dependent on Russian energy, have greater bargain power, and have been able to negotiate lower natural gas prices. 

The full text of Petersen's article Russia's Energy Bully Takes a Fall can be downloaded here.

Alexandros Petersen is an advisor to the Wilson Center's European Energy Security Initiative and the author of The World Island: Eurasian Geopolitics and the Fate of the West.

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Alexandros Petersen

Alexandros Petersen

Former Advisor: European Energy Security Initiative; Former Public Policy Scholar
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Global Europe Program

The Global Europe Program addresses vital issues affecting the European continent, U.S.-European relations, and Europe’s ties with the rest of the world. It does this through scholars-in-residence, seminars, policy study groups, media commentary, international conferences and publications. Activities cover a wide range of topics, from the role of NATO, the European Union and the OSCE to European energy security, trade disputes, challenges to democracy, and counter-terrorism. The program investigates European approaches to policy issues of importance to the United States, including globalization, digital transformation, climate, migration, global governance, and relations with Russia and Eurasia, China and the Indo-Pacific, the Middle East and Africa.  Read more