International Security

The Quetta Experience: Attitudes and Values within Pakistan's Army

The Pakistani Army has long been a challenging yet critical partner for the U.S. government.
 
On the one hand, Washington views it as the architect of policies that are deeply problematic for the United States. These policies include the development and production of nuclear weapons, and the provision of safe havens for terrorists that target American soldiers across the border in Afghanistan. Despite Washington’s efforts to get Pakistan to alter these policies, they have remained in place for several decades.
 

Event Recap: Chinese Expansion and the South China Sea: Beijing’s Strategic Ambition and the Asian Order

China’s ambitions to become Asia’s undisputed regional hegemon is evident in the South China Sea, as Beijing creates military bases along remote reefs and islands in a 1.5-million-square mile expanse. Humphrey Hawksley, the author of Asian Waters: The Struggle Over the South China Sea and Strategy of Chinese Expansion, Los Angeles Times Deputy Washington Bureau Chief Bob Drogin, and former U.S. Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asia James Clad, spoke at the Wilson Center to discuss the rivalry between China and the United States, and the dilemma facing countries in the region.

China Looks South

There is little question that the first half of the 21st century will see a momentous contest between the United States and China for primacy in Asia–with the initial focus on Southeast Asia and the South China Sea. In the decades following World War II the American preeminence in the region, politically, culturally, economically, and militarily, was clear even as U.S. forces left Indochina, their mission unaccomplished. However, the dramatic rise of China out of the ruins of civil war and Maoist excesses has changed the strategic landscape utterly.

Deepening a Natural Partnership? Assessing the State of U.S.-India Counterterrorism Cooperation

Nearly a year after the Washington summit meeting between President Trump and Prime Minister Modi, U.S.-India relations, and particularly bilateral security relations, are making ample progress. To assess that progress, the Asia Program invited security analyst Amit Kumar to speak on June 14th at the Wilson Center. As Michael Kugelman, the deputy director of the Asia Program, mentioned in the beginning of the event, the India-U.S.

Chinese Expansion and the South China Sea: Beijing’s Strategic Ambition and the Asian Order

China’s ambitions to become Asia’s undisputed regional hegemon is perhaps most evident in the South China Sea, as Beijing creates military bases along remote reefs and islands in a 1.5-million-square mile expanse.  Join us for a discussion with Humphrey Hawksley, au

Deepening a Natural Partnership? Assessing the State of U.S.-India Counterterrorism Cooperation

Nearly a year after the Washington summit meeting between U.S. President and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, U.S.-India relations, and particularly bilateral security relations, are making ample progress. One critical area of the security partnership lies in counterterrorism cooperation. At this event, security analyst Amit Kumar will discuss recent developments in U.S.-India counterterrorism cooperation, highlight any potential obstacles for deeper cooperation, and consider the implications of this collaboration for Pakistan and South Asia more broadly.

U.S. National Security Strategy: Implications for the U.S.-Japan Alliance

Tensions continue to rise in East Asia, not least with the continued threat of a nuclear North Korea, coupled with China’s ever-growing military, economic, and political aspirations for regional hegemony. Expectations for Japan to play a critical role to ensure peace and stability have increased as a result, and strong ties between Tokyo and Washington remain critical for the two sides to work closely together.

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